Be Anchored

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Have you ever felt like you were drifting at sea? Like you’re a boat out on the endless ocean, tossed and thrown by currents and winds beyond your control? I have, especially lately. The election was disappointing; America made a statement, one that I’m unsure of as to how it bodes for me. My job seems to be a constant reminder of how inadequate and insufficient I am. And there are sins that started almost 2 decades ago that seem to be just as vigilant and bent on destroying me as the day they first extended their gangrene branch my way with an offer. There are multiple winds in my sail right now that make this little boat feel disoriented and lost. And yet, even so, there is an anchor. An anchor is a device used to help a boat not float away due to the wind or the water current. A boat, though tied to an anchor, is still subject to the tide and other elements that brush against it. It may rock from side to side or even drift a little past the dock. But as long as the anchor is stronger than the elements, the boat is secure.

In 2 Corinthians 4 Paul speaks of how believers have the light of gospel given to them by the grace of God. Believers have been given the ability to hold the treasure of the knowledge of the glory of God and knowing Jesus Christ as Lord. But Paul reminds us that we although we possess this treasure, we possess it in jars of clay. And anyone who has worked with pottery can tell you how it shatters easily; how if it is dropped or pressed too hard that it will break into a number of pieces making it impossible to place back together. Paul shows us how it is only the surpassing power of God that sustains, and anchors, us in the holding of this gift.

But we have this treasure in jars of clay, to show that the surpassing power belongs to God and not to us. We are afflicted in every way, but not crushed; perplexed, but not driven to despair; persecuted, but not forsaken; struck down, but not destroyed; (2 Cor. 4:7-9)

Afflicted, perplexed, driven, persecuted, and struck down. Believer, you are every bit of saved and every bit of human. We are not supernatural in the sense that we are not affected by the very events of the world we live in. Your boat may be secure but it is surely affected by the current. We as believers carry the gospel of Christ in our hearts, for sure, but we carry it in fragile vessels, able to be affected by numerous elements. But it is in this being affected by the winds of the world that we are reminded that we have a heavy and sure anchor that keeps our boat from drifting too far!

Hebrews 6:19 reminds us that God’s unchangeable character to do all He has promised is the anchor that our vessels let down into the ocean to keep them as they float. The Father has already sent us His Son as the payment for our sins and the bridge between Him and mankind. Him and the Son,then, have both sent the Holy Spirit to dwell in the hearts of those who will believe. God dwells with us; even in the boat. That means that our vessels, though rocked to and fro by the gales of a broken world, are not inhabited by us alone; the believer has not only a passenger but a Captain of the vessel, who has plans for a hope and future for you. This Captain has promised to work all things for the good of those who love God and are called according to His purpose. This Captain is not only captain of the boat, but also Sender of the winds themselves. Our Captain knows exactly how hard our boats are rocked since no wind is allowed to blow without permission from Him first. Believer, our God is in control.

And if this God we serve and love, who first loved us, is in control, we can float safely. We can float with the winds of an ever-changing government; we can float with the gusts of an overwhelming job; we can float with the draft of the slowness of sanctification. If our anchor is the everlasting God, then we can know that no matter how much we drift in the currents of life, we are kept by Him. So, beloved, it is OK to drift; but please, be anchored.

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